PATC 2011: 4th Annual Pennsylvania Autism Training Conference

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Presented by John J. McGonigle, PhD

This session focuses on differentiating developmental and behavioral factors from psychiatric syndromes, and formulating Psychiatric Diagnosis in persons with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Discussed are best practice approaches in the assessment and treatment of persons with autism and co-occurring mental health conditions.

Presented by Robert Schultz, PhD

This presentation is composed of four parts. Part 1 reviews the phenomenology of ASD – the cognitive, affective and behavioral features as described in DSM IV and V, with a focus on social motivation, social perception and social cognition. Part 2 describes recent discoveries in genetics and explains why genetics is so relevant to the development of novel treatments. Part 3 reviews the past 10 years of brain imaging research. Part 4 describes a new treatment study at CHOP using computerized gaming with and without the neural hormone oxytocin as standardized intervention to develop social skills.

Presented by Paul Wehman, PhD

This session provides information on how to most effectively transition youth with ASD into the community. The Project Search Model is described as well as case studies of successful young people working in the internship sites. Specific transition competencies are presented and discussed.

Please note that certain sections of the recorded presentation have been removed to maintain confidentiality of the individuals discussed.

Presented by Claire Maher Choutka, MEd, BCBA & Amy Alford, MEd, BAS

In collaboration with Courtney Coover, OMHSAS

This session reviews the definition and importance of ethics, considerations specific to the Commonwealth of PA, informed consent, confidentiality, and protecting the person's dignity, health, and safety. During the live session, participants discussed and reviewed ethical case studies.

Presented by Diane Bannerman Juracek, PhD

The Family Teaching Model is a community-based residential model for adults with intellectual developmental disabilities developed in Lawrence, Kansas, where a trained couple and their family members live (typically in a duplex) immediately adjacent to 3 or 4 people with significant needs, and where the couple is responsible for supervision, teaching, care, and quality of life. This session shares information about Family Teacher training and certification based on implementation of eleven quality outcomes for persons served.

Presented by Paul Wehman, PhD

This session highlights the importance of work, how the supported employment model is applied to persons with ASD and developing partnerships with business. Additionally, information is presented on finding jobs, job site training, and customizing jobs for persons with ASD.

Please note that certain sections of the recorded presentation have been removed to maintain confidentiality of the individuals discussed.

Presented by Diane Bannerman Juracek, PhD

In the pursuit of efficient habilitation, many service providers exercise a great deal of control over the lives of individuals with intellectual developmental disabilities. For example, service providers often choose habilitative goals, determine daily schedules, regulate access to preferred activities and control choices, supposedly in the “best interests” of the individual. This presentation examines the advantages and disadvantages of allowing personal liberties, and then provides numerous examples of how to support citizens with developmental disabilities in exercising a variety of freedoms, including learning to make choices, solve problems, exhibit more control over their “person-centered’ planning, and make decisions with housemates using a simplified voting process.